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Alexander Golant, MD - Orthopedic Surgeon
Alexander Golant, MD - Orthopedic Surgeon
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Orthopaedic Surgeons
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News Updates

Prospective study showed TKA not detrimental to patient participation in sports
Source:
Healio

Results of a study presented at European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy Congress, here, showed patients who participated in sports before total knee arthroplasty were able to participate in sports postoperatively and in some cases, patients were more active in sports after surgery.

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Better fix for torn ACLs
Source:
Science Daily

A torn anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, is one of the most common knee injuries. Approximately 200,000 Americans experience a torn ACL each year, and more than half undergo surgical repairs. Now, researchers have developed a model to show that a newer surgical technique results in a stronger, more natural ACL repair.

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Preoperative opioid use linked with lower outcome scores after TSA
Source:
Healio

Patients with a history of preoperative opioid use experienced significantly lower preoperative baseline and final outcome scores after total shoulder arthroplasty than patients who did not take opioids preoperatively, according to results.

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Platelet-rich plasma injections may lead to improvements in tissue healing
Source:
Science Daily

After platelet-rich plasma injections, researchers have described the structural change in the healing process as well as improvement in patients' pain and function, in a new report.

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Malnourished patients had increased risk for short-term complications after TSA
Source:
Healio

Patients who were malnourished prior to total shoulder arthroplasty experienced a significantly increased risk for blood transfusion, longer hospital length of stay and death within 30 days of surgery, according to results.

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Low Star Excursion Balance Test scores linked with risk of ankle sprains in football players
Source:
Healio

Recently published results that evaluated high school and collegiate football players during the preseason highlighted lower Star Excursion Balance Test scores for anterior reach as a predictor of lateral ankle sprains and noted players who had these injuries had a significantly higher BMI.

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Obesity and total joint arthroplasty: Time to examine needs in a different light
Source:
Healio

The prevalence of obesity in the general population is increasing. Obesity is estimated to affect approximately one-third of adults in the United States. It is estimated that 6.1 million patients who undergo total joint arthroplasty will be obese by 2040.

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Lifelong physical activity increases bone density in men
Source:
Science Daily

Men have many reasons to add high-impact and resistance training to their exercise regimens; these reasons include building muscle and shedding fat. Now a researcher has determined another significant benefit to these activities: building bone mass. The study found that individuals who continuously participated in high-impact activities, such as jogging and tennis, during adolescence and young adulthood, had greater hip and lumbar spine bone mineral density than those who did not.

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Newer UKR prosthesis for patients with osteoarthritis achieved satisfactory results
Source:
Healio

Patients who received a newer prosthesis similar to the Miller-Galante knee design showed significantly better Knee Society function scores than patients who had a long-used prosthesis to which it was compared. However, the two implants performed about the same at short-term follow-up, according to a presenter.

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Treatment of Locked Posterior Shoulder Dislocation With Bone Defect
Source:
Healio

Posterior shoulder dislocation is rare, and in most cases, it occurs secondary to violent trauma, seizures, or electric shock.1 Approximately 50% of these dislocations are associated with reverse Hill-Sachs lesions.2 Hill and Sachs3 described the lesion in an anterior shoulder dislocation caused by engagement of the humeral head into the glenoid edge and located posterosuperiorly in the head.

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Patient-reported results, knee stability improved after all-inside double-bundle ACL reconstruction
Source:
Healio

Investigators found significant improvements from preoperative measures at 24.8-month follow-up for both mean side-to-side differences and Lysholm scores in patients who underwent double-bundle ACL reconstruction using a special drill pin guide and reamer, along with a laser-guided device to facilitate a transtibial approach

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Imaging identifies cartilage regeneration in long-distance runners
Source:
RSNA News

Using a mobile MRI truck, researchers followed runners for 4,500 kilometers through Europe to study the physical limits and adaptation of athletes over a 64-day period, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

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Martial arts can be hazardous to kids
Source:
Medical Xpress

Perhaps there's a black belt in your child's future. But for safety's sake, kids should only engage in noncontact forms of martial arts, a new American Academy of Pediatrics report says.

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Rate of injuries among youth soccer players doubled, new study finds
Source:
Sciencedaily

From 1990 through 2014, the number of soccer-related injuries treated in hospital emergency departments in the US each year increased by 78 percent and the yearly rate of injuries increased by 111 percent among youth 7-17 years of age, a new article reports.

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Study finds predictors for ACL injury are dissimilar between male and female athletes
Source:
Healio

Except for increased anterior-posterior knee laxity, results from this study indicated female athletes and male athletes were not similar with regard to predictors for first-time noncontact ACL injury.

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Robotic Total Knee Arthroplasty: Surgical Assistant for a Customized Normal Kinematic Knee
Source:
Healio

Robotic-assisted surgery aims to improve TKA by enhancing the surgeon's ability to optimize soft tissue balancing, reproduce alignment, and restore normal knee kinematics.

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Hamstring injuries in baseball may be preventable
Source:
Medical Xpress

Creating a program to prevent hamstring injuries in minor league and major league baseball players might be a possibility say researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO.

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Prospective study showed TKA not detrimental to patient participation in sports
Source:
Healio

Results of a study presented at European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy Congress, here, showed patients who participated in sports before total knee arthroplasty were able to participate in sports postoperatively and in some cases, patients were more active in sports after surgery.

Read More


Better fix for torn ACLs
Source:
Science Daily

Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have developed a model to show that a newer surgical technique results in a stronger, more natural ACL repair.

Read More


Preoperative opioid use linked with lower outcome scores after TSA
Source:
Healio

Although recently published results showed no dynamic superior humeral head migration among patients with well- compensated single or two-tendon rotator cuff tears, an unexpected inferior shift during active elevation was found.

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Comparable results seen with high- vs low-intensity plyometric exercise after ACL reconstruction
Source:
Healio

Results from this randomized controlled trial showed both low- and high-intensity plyometric exercise for rehabilitation following ACL reconstruction positively affected knee function, knee impairments and psychological status among patients after 8 weeks of intervention.

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Platelet-rich plasma injections may lead to improvements in tissue healing
Source:
Medical Xpress

Tiger Woods, Kobe Bryant and A-Rod have all used it, but does platelet-rich plasma therapy (PRP) really work for the every-day active person? According to a University of Alberta Glen Sather Sports Medicine Clinic pilot study on patients with chronically sore shoulders published in PLOS ONE, preliminary findings say yes.

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Malnourished patients had increased risk for short-term complications after TSA
Source:
Healio

Patients who were malnourished prior to total shoulder arthroplasty experienced a significantly increased risk for blood transfusion, longer hospital stay and death within 30 days of surgery, according to results of this retrospective database study.

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Hemiarthroplasty, TSA yielded pain relief for patients with atraumatic osteonecrosis
Source:
Healio

Patients with atraumatic osteonecrosis of the humeral head experienced lasting pain relief and improved range of motion after undergoing either hemiarthroplasty or total shoulder arthroplasty, according to results.

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Why treating shoulder pain in baseball pitchers and other throwing athletes is so difficult
Source:
Science Daily

Despite increasing medical knowledge, treating shoulder pain in baseball pitchers and other throwing athletes remains one of the most challenging tasks in sports medicine.

“The results of treatment are not as predictable as the patient, family, trainer, coach and doctor would like to think,” according to an article in the journal Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of North America.

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Imaging identifies cartilage regeneration in long-distance runners
Source:
Medical News Today

Using a mobile MRI truck, researchers followed runners for 4,500 kilometers through Europe to study the physical limits and adaptation of athletes over a 64-day period, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

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What Happens When You Crack Your Knuckles
Source:
Daily Rx News

Despite the wives' tales that tie cracking your knuckles to problems like arthritis, many habitual knuckle-crackers just can't help themselves. But do they really have anything to fear?

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Joint Surgery Predicted By Number Of Children And Use Of HRT
Source:
Medical News Today

According to a study published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, women who have many children, usedhormone replacement therapy, and had early puberty are more likely to have surgery performed on their joints - especially on their knees.

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Pro athletes may safely return to competition after lumbar microdiscectomy
Source:
Healio

CHICAGO — The pooled rate of return to play following lumbar microdiscectomy for herniated disc nucleus was 83.5%, according to results presented at the North American Spine Society Annual Meeting, and the overall return to play rate for elite athletes with a herniated disc after this procedure was 84.5%.

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Recommendations for patient activity after knee replacement vary among surgeons
Source:
Healio

During recovery after knee replacement surgery, exercise is critical. After initial recovery, patients will want to resume more strenuous activities. In addition to exercise prescribed by a physical therapist, several studies have shown patients who participated in athletic activities prior to surgery will want to continue this practice after surgery. However, how much activity and how strenuous this activity should be remains unclear.

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Stresses on elbow during pitching may alter multiple structures
Source:
Healio

In a pre- and post-season ultrasound evaluation of high school pitchers’ elbows, adaptive changes occurred to multiple structures about the elbow from stresses placed on the elbow during one season of pitching, based on results of a recently published study.

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Cholesterol levels and tendon pain may be related
Source:
Reuters

(Reuters Health) – People with unhealthy blood cholesterol levels are more likely to have tendon pain or altered tendon structure, according to a new review.

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Prevalence of Total Hip and Knee Replacement in the United States
Source:
JBJS

Descriptive epidemiology of total joint replacement procedures is limited to annual procedure volumes (incidence). The prevalence of the growing number of individuals living with a total hip or total knee replacement is currently unknown.

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Bats and balls, not base runners, cause worst injuries to major league catchers
Source:
Medical Xpress

Contrary to popular belief, the worst injuries baseball catchers face on the field come from errant bats and foul balls, not home-plate collisions with base runners, according to findings of a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

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Stiff shoulders less likely to re-tear after rotator cuff repair vs non-stiff shoulders
Source:
Healio

Patients who had preoperative shoulder stiffness and those who developed stiffness at 6 weeks and 12 weeks postoperatively after rotator cuff repair were less likely to experience a re-tear compared with patients who had no stiffness, according to results presented here.

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What constitutes good treatment of tennis elbow?
Source:
Medical Xpress

What is the best treatment for acute tennis elbow? Physiotherapy? Cortisone? A combination? Or might you just as well forego treatment?

The two most common treatments for tennis elbow are physiotherapy and cortisone injections.

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Greater strength, endurance found in quadriceps after PCL tear vs ACL tear
Source:
Healio

Compared with ACL tears, the quadriceps muscle of the injured limb had greater strength and endurance after PCL tears, according to study results.

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Treatment of shoulder instability helps return collegiate athletes to playing field
Source:
Medical News Today

Athletes who suffer a shoulder instability injury may return to play more successfully after being treated arthroscopically compared to nonoperative treatment, say researchers presenting their work at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting.

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Swiss researchers evaluate fetal progenitor tenocytes for repairing tendon injuries
Source:
Medical Xpress

Tendon injuries, especially those acquired while engaging in sports, are not easily healed due to the fibrous nature of tendon tissues which transmit forces from muscle to bone and protect surrounding tissues against tension and compression. Tendon injuries to wrists, knees, elbows and rotator cuffs, often from over use when playing golf or tennis, are increasingly common for both professional and amateur athletes ("weekend warriors") alike.

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Make no bones about it: The female athlete triad can lead to problems with bone health
Source:
Medical Xpress

Participation in sports by women and girls has increased from 310,000 individuals in 1971 to 3.37 million in 2010. At the same time, sports-related injuries among female athletes have skyrocketed. According to a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS), women with symptoms known as the "female athlete triad" are at greater risk of bone stress injuries and fractures.

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Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for the Massive Rotator Cuff Tear
Source:
ICJR

Orthopaedic surgeons have become increasingly interested in the use of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty to manage massive rotator cuff tears. This has been due to the success we have had with the procedure as the rate of complications decreased, thanks to the significant knowledge we have gained over the course of the past 10 years of using the reverse prosthesis.

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Panel discusses epidemic of youth sports injuries, role of prevention programs
Source:
Healio

At Orthopedics Today Hawaii 2015, we convened a special Banyan Tree session to talk about injuries in youth athletes. This is a real problem that all orthopedic surgeons see on a regular basis — one that, I think, is still under-recognized. In this Orthopedics Today Round Table, we highlight the discussion, particularly as it relates to overhead sports, as well as how orthopedic surgeons can play a role in stemming the tide of injuries. We also talk about innovations to help with prevention and treatment, as well as the role of the STOP Sports Injuries and Pitch Smart programs.

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Nearly half of patients safe for discharge by postoperative day 2 after total joint arthroplasty
Source:
Healio

Among patients who underwent total joint arthroplasty required to follow the Medicare 72-hour-stay rule, 47.88% were safe for discharge to a skilled nursing facility by postoperative day 2, according to results presented at the American Orthopaedic Association Annual Meeting.

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Osteochondral autograft transplantation may offer higher rate of return to pre-injury athletics
Source:
Healio

Among patients who underwent cartilage repair of the knee, osteochondral autograft transplantation enabled a much higher rate of return to pre-injury athletics, according to results presented at the International Cartilage Repair Society Annual Meeting.

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High risk of capsular restretching found among women and elite athletes
Source:
Healio

Even after successful arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift, women, elite athletes and patients with frequent dislocations were at high risk of capsular restretching, according to study results.

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MRI showed imaging abnormalities but good clinical results with ACI
Source:
Healio

CHICAGO — MRI appearance of autologous chondrocyte implantation showed imaging abnormalities at 65.8-month follow-up; however, autologous chondrocyte implantation was still found to produce good clinical results, according to data presented at the International Cartilage Repair Society Annual Meeting, here.

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Caregivers frequently unaware of safety guidelines for young baseball pitchers
Source:
Healio

Results of a survey presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting indicated caregivers were frequently unaware of safety guidelines recommended for young baseball pitchers.

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A hip and trunk training program for athletes reduces ACL injuries
Source:
Medical Xpress

With the help of the Hockeyroos UWA researchers have developed a hip and trunk training program that could reduce the high rates of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in all levels of sport.

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Year-round baseball leads to more youth injuries, study says
Source:
Medical Xpress

Being able to play baseball year-round puts young pitchers in the southern United States at increased risk for an overuse injury in their throwing arm, a new study finds.

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Exercise science study shows no increased risk of injury from uphill/downhill running
Source:
MedicalXpress

Like many runners, former BYU track star Katy Andrews Neves has had her share of injuries. Unlike most runners, one of those injuries has been witnessed by millions of people around the world.

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Common hip issue in teens misdiagnosed as pulled muscle
Source:
Science Daily

An athlete felt pain in his groin after a collision at the plate with an opposing player. He thought he had pulled a muscle, but it turns out he was suffering from a common condition seen in teens and young adults known as hip impingement.

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Osteoarthritis patients will benefit from jumping exercise
Source:
MedicalXpress

Progressive high-impact training improved the patellar cartilage quality of the postmenopausal women who may be at risk of osteoporosis (bone loss) as well as at risk of osteoarthritis. This was found out in the study carry out in the Department of Health Sciences at University of Jyväskylä, Finland. The effects of high-impact exercise were examined on knee cartilages, osteoarthritis symptoms and physical function in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. The study was conducted in cooperation with the Central Finland Central Hospital and the Department of Medical Technology, Institute of Biomedicine in University of Oulu in Finland.

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Alternative for pain control after knee replacement surgery
Source :
Science Daily

Injecting a newer long-acting numbing medicine called liposomal bupivacaine into the tissue surrounding the knee during surgery may provide a faster recovery and higher patient satisfaction, a new study has found.

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Why treating shoulder pain in baseball pitchers and other throwing athletes is so difficult
Source :
Science Daily

Despite increasing medical knowledge, treating shoulder pain in baseball pitchers and other throwing athletes remains one of the most challenging tasks in sports medicine. Results of treatment as not as predictable as patients, doctors or coaches would like to think.

Read More


Link possible between oral contraceptive use, ACL injury in females
Source :
Healio

Researchers from Denmark have uncovered a potential link between oral contraceptive use and instances of ACL injuries that required surgical intervention in women. The researchers evaluated 4,497 women who were treated operatively for an ACL injury between July 2005 and December 2011 and 8,858 age-matched, uninjured controls.

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Thumbs-up for mind-controlled robotic arm
Source:
Science Daily

A paralyzed woman who controlled a robotic arm using just her thoughts has taken another step towards restoring her natural movements by controlling the arm with a range of complex hand movements.

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Staying at Home for Knee Rehab
Source:
DailyRx

After a knee replacement, there's no place like home for your physical therapy — or at least home may be just as good a place as a clinic to do your exercises.

In a new study, knee replacement patients who followed a six-week, monitored exercise program at home showed similar progress to those who were in regular outpatient rehabilitation programs.

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Habitual running 'may protect against knee osteoarthritis, not cause it'
Source:
Medical News Today

Osteoarthritis is a joint disease characterized by the breakdown of the cartilage, joint lining, ligaments and bone. It most commonly affects the knees, hips, hands and spine. Around 26.9 million adults in the US are estimated to have some form of osteoarthritis, with middle-aged and elderly individuals being most affected.

Although it is unclear exactly what causes osteoarthritis, some studies have suggested that regular running may contribute to the disease. But the team notes that such studies have been conducted in professional male runners, so they may not apply to the general public.

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Intra-articular tranexamic acid benefitted TKA patients without increased risk of DVT, PE
Source:
Healio

Among patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty, intra-articular tranexamic acid significantly reduced total blood loss, drainage, reduction of hemoglobin and the need for transfusion without increasing the incidence of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, making it safe and efficacious, according to study results.

Through a search of various databases for relevant randomized, controlled trials, researchers included seven studies comprising 622 patients. The researchers calculated mean difference in total blood loss, risk ratio for transfusion and complication rate in the tranexamic acid-treated group vs. the placebo group.

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Rotator cuff repair may ease shoulder pain from spinal cord injury
Source:
Healio

Although they are likely to continue to overburden their shoulders, recently published data suggest patients in wheelchairs due to a spinal cord injury may gain pain relief from rotator cuff repair.

Researchers clinically and functionally evaluated 38 patients with a spinal cord injury who were either paraplegic or quadriplegic and presented with rotator cuff pathologies between January 2005 and September 2013. Patients’ lesions were also examined.

A total of 38 shoulders in 28 patients were indicated for rotator cuff repair, which was then performed. Intraoperative lesion assessment showed more substantial injuries than were indicated via imaging.

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In pro baseball pitchers, weak core linked to more missed days
Source:
MedicalXpress

New research suggests that professional baseball pitchers with poor core stability are more likely to miss 30 or more days in a single season because of injury than are pitchers who have good control of muscles in their lower back and pelvis.

"The core could help prevent injury by spreading out the energy load, allowing pitchers to use their legs more and their throwing arm less," Chaudhari said. "A stabilized core lets energy pass through it rather than getting lost as the core moves around, leading to less torque on the shoulder and elbow and better efficiency that helps with performance."

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Recovery regression seen in athletes who return from concussions too quickly
Source:
Healio

High school athletes who returned to the field after being medically cleared within 60 days of a concussion experienced significant regression in their ability to walk and do simple mental tasks simultaneously, according to results from a University of Oregon study.

The study included 19 adolescents with concussion who returned to preinjury activity within 2 months following injury and 19 uninjured, matched controls. Researchers had participants complete symptom inventories, computerized cognitive testing, and single- and dual-task gait analyses at five time points: within 72 hours of injury and again at 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month and 2 months.

Changes in walking speed and/or balance were seen in 12 out of 19 athletes, according to a University of Oregon press release. Ten of the 12 had returned to activity in less than a month. Seven athletes, who performed similarly to uninjured control subjects, had returned to action more than 20 days after their injuries.

“We had seen this same type of curve in an earlier study of college athletes,” study author Li-Shan Chou, PhD, said in the press release. “We didn’t have any evidence linking it to a return to activity, but we did discuss that possibility, because we knew that they usually were permitted to return to practice 2 weeks after a concussion.”

The current standard for allowing most athletes to return to activity is based mostly on self-reports of symptoms and individual assessments of cognition or motor function, according to the release.

Reference:
Howell DR. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2014; doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000462

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Fatigue issues pose biggest threat to arms of young baseball pitchers
Source:
Healio

Young baseball pitchers can lessen the likelihood of injury by taking steps to ensure their pitching does not overly fatigue their arm, according to recently published data.

Researchers conducted a national survey of 754 pitchers between the ages of 9 and 18 years who had pitched in organized youth baseball leagues during the previous 12 months. Self-reported risk-prone pitching activities were identified, while any correlations between all self-reported pitching activities, shoulder and elbow problems, and injuries were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression.

Of the overall cohort, 43.4% reported pitching on consecutive days, 30.7% pitched on multiple teams with overlapping seasons and 19% pitched multiple games a day. These activities led to having an increased odds ratio (2.53, 1.85 and 1.89, respectively) for pitching-related arm pain. Approximately 70% of pitchers threw curveballs, an activity that made them 1.66 times more likely to experience arm pain while throwing, according to the researchers.

Individuals who often pitched with arm tiredness and arm pain also had greater odds (7.88 and 7.50, respectively) of sustaining a pitching-related injury.

Pitching for a travel baseball club, playing baseball exclusively or playing catcher had no significant correlation to arm problems, the researchers found.

Disclosure: Funding for this study was provided by the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.

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Gender, level of sports participation associated with daily pain in adolescents
Source:
Healio

Nearly two out of three Danish adolescents reported pain during physical activity, and one out of three reported pain in more than one body region, with female sex and high level of sports participation associated with an increased odds of having daily and multi-site pain, according to study results.

In a population-based, cross-sectional study, researchers surveyed 4,007 Danish adolescents between the ages of 12 and 19 years using an online questionnaire. The questionnaires, given during physical education lessons, contained a mannequin divided into 12 regions, which participants used to indicate their current pain sites and pain frequency, characteristics, sports participation and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measured by EuroQol 5D.

Overall, 2,953 participants answered the questionnaire, with 33.3% reporting multi-site pain, 19.8% reporting almost daily pain and 61% reporting current pain in at least one region. The researchers found knee and back pain were the most common sites of pain.

Increased odds of having almost daily pain and multi-site pain were associated with female sex and a high level of sports participation, whereas a better EuroQol 5D score was associated with decreased odds of having almost daily pain or multi-site pain, according to study results.

Although pain tends to disappear with the right training, fitting training sessions into the lives of adolescents can be a challenge, according to study author, Michael S. Rathleff, PhD.

“It is worrying that the pain only disappears in the case of half of the young people who actually do the training,” Rathleff said in a press release. “The indications are that we should start the treatment somewhat earlier where it is easier to cute the pain. Though this does not necessarily mean that all adolescents with bad knees must visit a physiotherapist.”

References:

Rathleff MS. BMC Pediatr. 2013;doi:10.1186/1471-2431-13-191.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.

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Higher baseline expectations for TJR improved health-related quality of life, satisfaction
Source:
Healio

Health-related quality of life and satisfaction improved among patients who had higher expectations for total joint replacement at baseline compared with patients who had lower expectations, according to study results.

Researchers recruited 892 patients preparing for total joint replacement (TJR) of the knee or hip due to primary osteoarthritis. Before surgery and for 12 months afterward, patients completed questionnaires with five questions about expectations before surgery; an item to measure satisfaction; WOMAC and SF-12; and questions about sociodemographic information. The researchers performed general linear models and logistic regression analysis to determine the association of patients’ expectations at baseline with satisfaction and changes in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 12 months after surgery.

Study results showed larger improvements in HRQoL at 12 months among patients who had higher pain relief or ability to walk expectations. WOMAC and SF-12 physical component summary domains also improved more among patients with high expectations regarding the ability to walk, interact with other and psychological wellbeing expectations, according to the researchers.

Patients with very high expectations on the SF-12 physical component summary regarding their ability to walk and with high or very high pain relief expectations on SF-12 mental component summary experienced better improvement compared with patients with low expectations, the researchers found.

The researchers also found patients who had high or very high daily activities expectations were more likely to be satisfied.

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Autografts may improve ACL reconstructions
Source:
Medical News Today

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstructions occur more than 200,000 times a year, but the type of material used to create a new ligament may determine how long you stay in the game, say researchers who presented their work at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine (AOSSM).

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Identifying risk factors for ACL re-injury
Source:
Medical News Today

Re-tearing a repaired knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) happens all too frequently, however a recent study being presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting suggests that identification and patient education regarding modifiable risk factors may minimize the chance of a future ACL tear.

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Fixation of osteochondritis dissecans lesions produces good outcomes in young athletes
Source: Healio

A study presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine demonstrated positive long-term outcomes for young athletes with osteochondritis dissecans lesions.

Researchers identified 11 patients unable to participate in competitive sports due to osteochondritis dissecans lesions of the capitellum. Patients underwent loose body removal, lateral collateral ligament takedown from lateral epicondyle and plus transfer from the lateral trochlear ridge of the ipsilateral knee. All patients were then immobilized in a splint for 2 weeks, converted to a hinged elbow brace with progressive range of motion for 4 weeks, then resumed throwing and strengthening exercises at 3 months postoperatively. Metrics evaluated included chart review, return-to-play, elbow range of motion and DASH outcomes. Mean follow-up was 22.7 months.

All athletes returned to at least preoperative level of play at an average of 4.4 months, three of whom have received Division 1 college scholarships. Of the five pitchers, four returned to pitching. Average DASH score was 1.36, whereas the average Sport-Specific DASH score was 1.7. Gains were observed in both elbow flexion (125.45° to 141.36°) and extension (20.45° to 4.55°).

One wound infection occurred but did not impact return-to-play and was resolved with debridement and antibiotics. No complications or donor-site morbidity related to graft harvest were found.

Future research should focus on “long-term outcomes in terms of prevention of degenerative changes and their long-term activities and potentially technical advances to preserve the lateral collateral ligament,” study author and presenter, Matthew Lawrence Lyons, MD, concluded.— by Christian Ingram

Reference:

Lyons ML. Paper #14.Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 10-13, 2014; Seattle.

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Positive outcomes seen at long-term follow-up after meniscal repair
Source:
Healio

Arthroscopic meniscal repair was found to have a high probability of positive outcomes at long-term follow-up, according to a presenter here.

“Most patients did not have subsequent surgery until 5 years or greater following their initial repair,” Karen K. Briggs, MPH, MBA, said during her presentation at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

In the study, researchers analyzed 206 patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscal repair. Repair failure was defined by subsequent meniscal surgery (either re-repair or meiscectomy) or if the knee was converted to total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

Demographic data, SF12 physical component score and the mental component score, Lysholm score, WOMAC score, IKDC score, Tegner activity scale and patient satisfaction (1-10 scale) were all recorded. Average follow-up was approximately 14 years.

Overall, 64 knees were classified as failures (47 meniscectomies, 14 menicsal re-repairs, three TKAs). Average SF-12 physical component score was 54, and average mental component score was 54. The average Lysholm value at final follow-up was 86, average WOMAC value was 6 and the average IKDC value was 73, according to Briggs. Median Tegner activity scale value was 6, and median patient satisfaction score was 9.

Older patients did not experience an increase in failure of repair. —by Christian Ingram

Reference:

Steadman JR. Paper #45.Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 10-13, 2014; Seattle.

Disclosure:

The authors received research support from Smith & Nephew, Arthrex, Ossur and Siemens.

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High success rates seen for combined meniscal, ACL repair
Source:
Healio

Concurrent meniscal and ACL repair has shown high rates of success, according to a presenter here.
Researchers evaluated 235 patients from the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) who underwent both unilateral primary ACL reconstructions and concurrent meniscal repair between 2002 and 2004. Of the meniscal repairs, 154 were medial, 72 were lateral and nine underwent both.

Validated patient-oriented outcome data (KOOS, WOMAC) scores, Marx activity scores and IKDC scores were recorded at 2 and 6 years follow-up. Failure of meniscal repairs was determined by subsequent ipsilateral repair.

“This represents the largest cohort combining meniscus repair and ACL reconstruction follow-up for a minimum of 6 years,” Robert W. Westermann, MD, said during the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

Overall, 86% of meniscal repairs were successful at 6-year follow-up; of these, 86.4% were medial meniscal repair, 86.1% were lateral meniscal repairs and 77.8% were in cases where both were repaired, according to Westermann.

Of the 33 repair failures, nine (27.3%) were related to revision ACL surgery. On average, medial meniscal repairs failed sooner than lateral repairs (2.1 years vs. 3.7 years).

KOOS Symptoms, KOOS Pain, KOOS KRQOL, WOMAC Pain, and IKDC values all improved significantly when comparing baseline scores to 6-year follow-up, according to Westermann. Marx Activity levels gradually declined from time of injury to 6-year follow-up. — by Christian Ingram

Reference:

Westermann RW. Paper #44.Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 10-13, 2014; Seattle.

Disclosure:Westermann has no relevant financial disclosures.

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Bone-patellar tendon-bone ACL grafts show more tunnel motion than hamstring grafts
Source:
Healio

Patients with bone-patellar tendon-bone grafts have more tunnel motion rather than mid-substance stretch 6 weeks after ACL reconstruction when compared to patients with hamstring grafts, according to data presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

James N. Irvine, MD, and colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh prospectively studied 16 patients who had anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction done either with bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) grafts or hamstring grafts. Average patient age was 20 years, and both groups had identical tunnel locations, drilling and fixation. Data were available for 6 BTB patients and 6 hamstring patients.

The researchers embedded six 0.8-mm tantalum beads into the ACL grafts before implantation. Pairs of beads were placed within each bone tunnel and in the graft mid-substance. They obtained CT scans 6 weeks after surgery and used them to create 3-D femur and tibia bone models. Irvine and colleagues then fit cylindrical coordinate systems to the bone tunnels to assess tunnel motion and collected dynamic stereo X-ray images while patients walked and descended stairs. They defined graft-tunnel motion as the maximum displacement of the implanted beads along the bone tunnel axis after foot strike.

According to study results, both groups exhibited graft motion within the femoral and tibial tunnels, with more femoral tunnel graft motion seen in the BTB group during walking and stair descent. There was more BTB graft motion in the femoral tunnel than in the tibial tunnel.

For the hamstring grafts, researchers observed more graft motion in the tibial tunnel than in the femoral tunnel.

The researchers found no difference in knee kinematics between the grafts and no evidence of faster integration of BTB grafts over hamstring grafts. Furthermore, there was no detectable mid-substance strain in either group and no difference in knee kinematics, Irvine said.

“Quantitive MRI will be useful to further assess graft healing. Additional time points would be useful to better define rehabilitation protocols and return to sport,” he said.

A 1-year follow-up test is underway to see if the pattern reverses as graft-tunnel healing progresses. – by Kristine Houck, MA, ELS

Reference:

Irvine JN.Paper #22.Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 10-13, 2014; Seattle.

Disclosure: Irvine has no relevant financial disclosures.

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Improving healing in Achilles tendon injuries by embedding stem cells inside sutures
Source:
Medical News Today

Achilles tendon injuries are common for professional, collegiate and recreational athletes. These injuries are often treated surgically to reattach or repair the tendon if it has been torn. Patients have to keep their legs immobilized for a while after surgery before beginning their rehabilitation. Athletes may return to their activities sooner, but risk re-rupturing the tendon if it has not healed completely.

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82% of college football players return to field after ACL surgery, shows study
Source:
News Medical

High-level college football players frequently return to the field after an ACL reconstruction, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day. The study added to earlier research by exploring specific factors that affected return to play, including player standing on rosters and year in school.

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Houston Methodist sports medicine experts discuss important facts about mouthguards
Source:
News Medical

After every play, we all see the athletes adjusting their mouthguards, but what do they actually protect? Houston Methodist sports medicine experts discuss important facts about mouthguards.

Can wearing a mouthguard prevent a concussion?

"No, mouthguards cannot prevent a concussion," said Dr. Vijay Jotwani, a sports medicine-focused primary care physician with Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine. "Mouthguards do not affect the movement of the brain within the skull and cerebrospinal fluid, so they are ineffective at reducing the forces on the brain that cause concussions."

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Kids Who Played Sports Made Healthy Food Choices
Source:
DailyRx

Playing a sport is a healthy physical activity for kids, but does it promote healthy food and drink choices as well?Over 75 percent of boys and 69 percent of girls in middle elementary grades play sports. It has already been shown that high school kids who play sports eat more fruits and vegetables than those who don't play sports, but food and drink habits in elementary kids who play sports have not been well studied.

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Brain-training game improves vision and success of baseball players
Source:
Medical News Today

In baseball, vision can play a key role in a player's success. If they have trouble seeing the ball, chances are they could be out after three strikes. But new research from the University of California, Riverside, suggests that a brain-training video game could help to improve the vision of baseball players and, in turn, help them win more games.

Read More


Ready to Get in Shape? Ease Into Exercise, Experts Say
Source:
US news

Watching the Winter Olympics in Sochi may inspire some to get off the couch and begin working out or playing sports, but it's important to ease into these activities, an expert suggests.

"Just watching these events can serve as a tremendous inspiration to shape up, change or start a physical activity or sports regimen," Jim Thornton, president of the National Athletic Trainers' Association, said in a news release from the group.

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Healthier Hearts After Joint Surgery
Source:
DailyRx

For patients with arthritis, joint replacement surgery could mean more than relief from pain and stiffness. It might protect against heart disease too.

These researchers found that joint surgery significantly reduced arthritis patients' risk of heart problems like heart attack and stroke.

The authors of the study suggested that the surgery may have allowed patients to become more physically active, thus protecting them from heart disease.

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Jamming to Music at the Gym Helps Physiologically
Source:
Medical News Today

Many runners and gym-goers may have noticed that listening to music sometimes helps with running the last 400 meters or completing those final 20 reps. And now, researchers in Germany have found that controlling music while doing strenuous activity actually reduces the perceived effort.

Read more


Exercise May Prevent Fall-Related Injuries in Older Adults
Source:
Medical News Today

New research suggests that exercise programs aimed at preventing falls in older adults may also prevent injuries caused by falls. This is according to a study published in the BMJ.

These injuries can have serious implications on a person's mobility and independence, increasing the risk of discharge to a nursing home, as well as incurring high economic costs.

Read more


Hours Spent in Organized Sports May Predict Young Athlete Injury
Source:
Medical News Today

Athletes ages 8 to 18 who spend twice as many hours per week in organized sports than in free play, and especially in a single sport, are more likely to be injured, according to an abstract presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in Orlando.

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Young Athletes at Risk for Lower Back Injuries
Source:
Medical News Today

Lower back injuries are the third most common injuries suffered in athletes under age 18, according to a study presented by Loyola University Medical Center sports medicine physician NeeruJayanthi, MD.

Many injuries are severe enough to sideline young athletes for one-to-six months, and put them at future risk for long-term back problems.

Read more


Combating Sports-Related Concussions: New Device Accurately and Objectively Diagnoses Concussions from the Sidelines
Source:
Science daily

In the United States there are millions of sports-related concussions each year, but many go undiagnosed because for some athletes, the fear of being benched trumps the fear of permanent brain damage, and there is no objective test available to accurately diagnose concussions on the sidelines.

Balance tests are a primary method used to detect concussion. The current means of scoring these tests relies on the skill of athletic trainers to visually determine whether or not a concussion has occurred.

Read more


Fitness facilities more likely to have AEDs which improve survival odds following sudden cardiac arrest
Source:
Medical News Today

People experiencing sudden cardiac arrest at exercise facilities have a higher chance of survival than at other indoor locations, likely due to early CPR and access to an automated external defibrillator (AED), among other factors, according to a study published online today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The findings underscore the importance of having AEDs in places where people exert themselves and are at greater risk of sudden cardiac arrest.

Read more


Retired NFL players may not suffer unique cognitive disorder
Source:
Medical News Today

The media have widely reported that retired NFL players are at risk for a neurodegenerative disorder called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which causes symptoms such as aggression, depression, suicidality and progressive dementia.

Read more


Insomnia helped with exercise – eventually
Source:
Medical News Today

A new US study finds that it takes as long as four months for patients with insomnia to benefit from regular daily exercise.

It also finds that poor sleep can cause people to reduce the amount of exercise they do, and the researchers urge people with insomnia to persist and not expect exercise to be a quick cure.

Read more


Contact-sport brain trauma may affect personality and cognition
Source:
Medical News Today

Scientists have discovered that repeated brain trauma, which commonly occurs in athletes, may affect behavior, mood and thinking abilities, according to a study published in the journal Neurology.

All athletes had been diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) following death. CTE is a brain disease linked to repeated brain trauma - most commonly found in athletes.

Read more


Knee osteoarthritis risk unaffected by moderate exercise
Source:
Medical News Today

A new study suggests that the risk of middle-aged and older adults developing knee arthritis is unaffected by doing up to 150 minutes per week of moderate physical activity, the level recommended by the US government.

Knee arthritis leading cause of disability and joint pain Osteoarthritis occurs when the cartilage and underlying bone in a joint break down, leading to bony overgrowth, pain, swelling and stiffness.

The joints most affected are the knees, hips and those of the hands and spine. The condition, for which there is currently no cure, develops gradually, usually in the over-40s.

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Physical activity decreases sudden cardiac death risk in unfit men Source: Medical News Today

Dr Laukkanen said: "Sudden cardiac death (SCD) accounts for approximately 50% of deaths from coronary heart disease. SCD typically occurs shortly after the onset of symptoms, leaving little time for effective medical interventions, and most cases occur outside hospital with few or no early warning signs. Finding ways to identify individuals at elevated risk of SCD would allow early interventions on risk factors to be implemented."

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Women more likely to tear ACL due to 'knock knees'
Source:
Medical News Today

Researchers say that women are nearly four times more likely to suffer from a tear to the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) in the knee than men, but that it may be prevented by a different "landing strategy."

ACL injuries are defined as a tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament inside the knee joint. The injury causes the knee to swell, and the joint becomes too painful to bear weight.

These injuries are very common in sports where the participants are required to do many "jump stops and cuts." This includes basketball, soccer, tennis and volleyball.

Read more


Athletes Need to Be Careful to Monitor Diet, Weight to Maintain Muscle Mass
Source:
Science daily

Athletes seeking a healthy performance weight should eat high fiber, low-fat food balanced with their training regimen in order to maintain muscle while still burning fat, according to a report by an Oregon State University researcher.

"Depending on the sport, athletes sometime want to either lose weight without losing lean tissue, or gain weight, mostly lean tissue," she said. "This is very difficult to do if you restrict caloric intake too dramatically or try to lose the weight too fast. Doing that also means they don't have the energy to exercise or they feel tired and put themselves at risk of injury."

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Stress Fracture Risk May Be Modifiable
Source:
Science daily

The incidence rate for stress fracture injuries among females was nearly three times greater when compared to males. Knee rotation and abduction angles when landing were both associated with the rates of lower-extremity stress fractures, as were reduced knee and hip flexion angles, and increased vertical and medial ground reaction forces.

"Lower extremity movement patterns and strength have previously been associated with stress fractures and overuse injuries; however, our study is one of the first to identify dynamic knee rotation and frontal plane angles as important prospective risk factors for lower extremity stress fractures.

Read more


A Popular Myth About Running Injuries
Source:
NY times

Almost everyone who runs (or has shopped for running shoes) has heard that how your foot pronates, or rolls inward, as you land affects your injury risk. Pronate too much or too little, conventional wisdom tells us, and you'll wind up hurt. But a provocative new study shows that this deeply entrenched belief is probably wrong and that there is still a great deal we don't understand about pronation and why the foot rolls as it does.

Read more


Monitoring Nutrient Intake Can Help Vegetarian Athletes Stay Competitive
Source:
Science daily

"Vegetarian athletes can meet their dietary needs from predominantly or exclusively plant-based sources when a variety of these foods are consumed daily and energy intake is adequate," Ghosh wrote in his presentation.

Vegetarians should find non-meat sources of iron, creatine, zinc, vitamin B12, vitamin D and calcium because the main sources of these typically are animal products and could be lacking in their diets. Vegetarian women, in particular, are at increased risk for non-anemic iron deficiency, which may limit endurance performance. In addition, vegetarians as a group have lower mean muscle creatine concentrations, which may affect high-level exercise performance.

Read more


Muscle Adaptation Of Transition To Minimalist Running
Source
: Medical News Today

For tens of thousands of years, humans ran on bare feet. Then we developed an assortment of specialized shoes, including - particularly since the 1960s - a seemingly limitless variety of running shoes. Despite the perceived advantages of foot protection, some runners in recent years have returned to barefoot running, believing it is a more natural way to run and therefore less injurious to the feet and legs.

Read more


Statins May Reduce Exercise Benefits For Obese Adults
Source:
Medical News Today

Statins, the most widely prescribed drugs worldwide, are often suggested to lower cholesterol and prevent heart disease in individuals with obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, which is a combination of medical disorders including excess body fat and/or high levels of blood pressure, blood sugar and/or cholesterol. However, University of Missouri researchers found that simvastatin, a generic type of statin previously sold under the brand name "Zocor," hindered the positive effects of exercise for obese and overweight adults.

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Additional oblique MRI improved diagnosis of ACL tears
Source:
Healio

The accuracy of diagnosing an ACL tear and efficacy in detecting ACL remnant tissue was improved with the additional use of oblique MRI, according to recently published study.

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No Gym Necessary: 4 Anywhere-Exercises
Source:
US news

Quit the gym. Or rather, if the 40 or 50 bucks you shell out each month for a membership is shrinking your wallet, remember that folks have been exercising since long before the days of ellipticals and spin classes. Many exercises can be done just about anywhere, any time. Squats in the office; push-ups as the pasta cooks; lunges during "Game of Thrones"—there's no need to pay cash for these moves, just cold, hard calories. Below, five fitness experts with a collective six-pack of 30 abs (don't think about the math too hard) dole out their favorite exercises that require no gym, no trainer and barely any equipment.

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Youth football concussions occurred mostly during games, not practice
Source:
Healio

Children playing tackle football are more likely to sustain a concussion during games and not practice, according to recent study results published in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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12 Minutes Of Exercise A Week Could Be Enough To Stay Fit
Source:
Medical News Today

"Regular exercise training improves maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), but the optimal intensity and volume necessary to obtain maximal benefit remains to be defined. A growing body of evidence suggests that exercise training with low-volume but high-intensity may be a time-efficient means to achieve health benefits."

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Heart Health Of Men With Type 2 Diabetes Improved By Soccer Training
Source
: Medical News Today

Soccer training makes the heart ten years younger.

"We discovered that soccer training significantly improved the flexibility of the heart and furthermore, that the cardiac muscle tissue was able to work 29% faster. This means that after three months of training, the heart had become 10 years 'younger'", explains Medical Doctor, PhD Student, Jakob Friis Schmidt, who co-authored the study alongside with PhD student, Thomas Rostgaard Andersen. He adds:

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When Athletic Shoes Cause Injury
Source:
NY times

Sometimes innovative science requires innovative machinery, like a moveable, four-legged robotic sled that can wear shoes, a contraption recently developed and deployed by researchers at the University of Calgary to test whether grippy athletic shoes affect injury risk.

It's well known, of course, that shoe traction influences athletic performance, especially in sports that involve sprinting or cutting, meaning abrupt rapid shifts in direction. In broad terms, more traction leads to better results.

Read more


Walking Reduces Heart Risk As Much As Running
Source:
Medical News Today

Brisk walking can reduce a person's risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol just as much as running can.

Walking and running provide an ideal test of the health benefits of moderate-intensity walking and vigorous-intensity running because they involve the same muscle groups and the same activities performed at different intensities."

Read more


Losing Your "Sole": Is Barefoot Running Right For You?
Source:
Medical Breakthrough

A Wake Forest University study finds up to 65 percent of runners suffers an overuse injury each year. More and more are looking for new ways to avoid these aches and pains. Now, there's one trend that some swear by, but you may have to say goodbye to what many consider to be the most important piece of running gear.

Read more


Walking For 20 Minutes A Day Can Help Teens Quit Smoking
Source:
Medical News Today

Walking for just 20 minutes a day can help teenage smokers cut down on their smoking habit.

Teens are even more likely to quit altogether if they participate in a smoking cessation/fitness program and increase the days on which they get at least 30 minutes of exercise.

Read more


Sidelined from Sports Specialization
Source:
DailyRx.com

Sports injury more likely in young athletes who specialize in one sport Competition among young athletes can be fierce—so fierce, in fact, that some athletes may play their sport more than they can handle. And that intense focus on one sport may put these growing athletes at risk of serious injury.

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High Heart Rate At Rest Signals Higher Risk Of Death Even In Fit Healthy People
Source:
Medical News Today

A high heart rate (pulse) at rest is linked to a higher risk of death even in physically fit, healthy people, suggests research published online in the journal Heart.

A resting heart rate - the number of heart beats per minute - is determined by an individual's level of physical fitness, circulating hormones, and the autonomic nervous system. A rate at rest of between 60 and 100 beats per minute is considered normal.

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Innovative Design Enables Runners To Read On A Treadmill
Source:
Medical News Today

A new innovation allows treadmill users to work their bodies and brains at the same time.

The system, called ReadingMate, adjusts text on a monitor to counteract the bobbing motion of a runner's head so that the text appears still, said Ji Soo Yi, an assistant professor of industrial engineering at Purdue University.

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Help Young Pitchers Avoid Overuse Injuries
Source:
US news

The start of baseball season is a good time for parents and coaches to talk to young pitchers about how to prevent overuse injuries, an expert suggests.

Bones, muscles and connective tissues are not fully developed in most children up to age 16, so too much pitching can lead to injury, explained Dr. Michael Freehill, an assistant professor of orthopedics at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

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Fractures Take High Toll on High School Athletes
Source:
MedicineNet.Com

Fractures account for about 10 percent of all injuries suffered by U.S. high school athletes, and can have a major physical, emotional and financial impact on the young competitors, according to a new study.

The findings highlight the need for fracture prevention programs in high school sports, the Ohio State University researchers said.

Researchers analyzed 2008-2009 and 2010-2011 data from the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System. Fracture rates were highest in boys' sports -- including football, ice hockey and lacrosse -- and boys suffered 79 percent of all fractures reported.

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Increase in Dance-Related Injuries in Children and Adolescents
Source:
Science Daily

Dance is a beautiful form of expression, but it could be physically taxing and strenuous on the human body, particularly for children and adolescents. A new study by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital examined dance-related injuries among children and adolescents 3 to 19 years of age from 1991 to 2007. During the 17-year study period, an estimated 113,000 children and adolescents were treated in U.S. emergency departments for dance-related injuries.

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Sitting For Long Hours Increases Risk Of Chronic Diseases
Source:
Medical News Today

Sitting for long hours is associated with an increased risk of developing chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and heart disease, according to recent research published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

The study, led by Kansas State University researcher Richard Rosenkranz, was carried out on a sample of 63,048 Australian men aged 45-65.

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Shoulder pain in the elderly
Source:
The star online

Frozen shoulder is a common, sometimes painful, self-limiting condition that can be adequately managed in the primary care setting.

SHOULDER pain commonly affects daily activities, and subsequently, the quality of life of our Malaysian seniors.

While elderly people are more likely to experience pain than the general population, in many instances, they are under-treated. Many older adults feel that pain is just a natural part of the ageing process and do not seek medical treatment until the condition has worsened.

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How to melt a frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis)
Source:
Fitness wellness News

Those who suffer a frozen shoulder know it’s not easily shrugged off.  Often, it’s not easily moved at all. Combined with a gripping pain and radiating aches, this condition really gets you in its clutches. Here are tips when you’re ready for a meltdown …

Most never give a thought to their shoulders and all the mechanics involved for their daily functioning. Until one day, for seemingly no explanation at all, they demand attention.

Although lifting a heavy object can trigger low back pain and an overstuffed pillow can kink your neck, the shoulder seems to suddenly protest for no reason. And when it does, don’t even think about a simple act like waving hello or flagging a taxi. A frozen shoulder also makes a lousy bed-partner. Dare to shift your arm the “wrong” way during the night, and it can interrupt sleep for hours with its complaining.

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FDA clears Soft Tissue Regeneration's STR GRAFT
Source:
News Medical

Soft Tissue Regeneration, an early stage orthopedic device company that has developed a breakthrough tissue engineering platform used to regenerate ligaments and tendons, announced today that it has received FDA clearance to market its STR GRAFT, a biodegradable scaffold used for soft tissue augmentation and rotator cuff repair.

Developed by Cato T. Laurencin , M.D., Ph.D., an orthopedic surgeon and the company's founder, the STR GRAFT is a three-dimensional braided engineered matrix that Laurencin likens to a patch. During surgery, surgeons can drape this biodegradable patch over the tendon that sits on the shoulder bone, anchoring it with sutures to keep it in place while the tendon, bones and nearby tissues heal. Unlike currently available devices, which are made of weaker cadaver or animal tissue that can cause sutures to pull, the STR GRAFT is thinner—about 1 millimeter—and stronger, which lessens pain, speeds recovery time and drastically reduces surgical failure rates. 

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More intense activity results in greater polyethylene wear for THA patients
Source:
Healio

More intense activity, rather than amount of activity, has been linked with greater in-vivo polyethylene wear in highly crosslinked polyethylene implants, according to a results of a study from the Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting.

“Based on this information, patients can be better instructed on what protects their joint form wear and what activities can be performed without affecting longevity,” Senden said. “Given our results, patients can protect the longevity of their implants without being less active.”

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Shoulder complaint linked to diabetes diagnosis
Source:
News Medical

Study findings confirm suspicions that patients with diabetes have an increased risk for adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (ACS).

Using insurance claims data for 96% of the Taiwanese population between 2000 and 2003, the researchers compared the incidence of ACS in 78,827 patients with at least ambulatory visits for diabetes and 236,481 age- and gender-matched individuals without diabetes.

After a median of 31.87 months of follow-up, 1.20% of diabetes patients and 0.95% of controls were diagnosed with ACS, at rates of 4.92 and 3.67 cases per 1000 person-years, respectively, say Shin-Liang Pan (National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei) and co-workers.

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Female Athletes Three Times More Likely to Suffer from Anterior Cruciate Ligament Ruptures
Source:
Science Daily

Female athletes are three times more likely to suffer from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, one of the most common knee injuries, compared to male athletes. The ACL is one of the four main ligaments within the knee that connect the femur (upper leg bone) to the tibia (lower leg bone). Recent research highlights the unique anatomical differences in the female knee that may contribute to higher injury rates, and should be taken into consideration during reconstructive surgery and sports training, according to a review article in the January 2013 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS).

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ACL therapy can get started a few days after surgery to jumpstart healing
Source:
dailyRX

In healing the ACL, therapies that focus on range-of-motion, strength and getting back to normal function are beneficial in the process, a new study has found.

Read More


Fewer injuries occur and more concussions are diagnosed in high schools with athletic trainers
Source:
dailyRX

Where there are athletic trainers, there are lower rates of injury overall in high schools, a new study presented at a conference has found.

This study's findings mean athletic trainers can show the proper way to exercise and treat an injury.

Read More


Association between lack of sleep and teen sports injuries
Source:
MedicalNewsToday

Hours of sleep per night were significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of injury, according to the study results. In addition, the higher the grade levels of the athlete, the greater the likelihood of injury - 2.3 times greater for each additional grade in school. Gender, weeks of participating in sports per year, hours of participation per week, number of sports, strength training, private coaching and subjective assessments of "having fun in sports" were not significantly associated with injury.

This study's findings mean athletic trainers can show the proper way to exercise and treat an injury.

Read More


Sports-related foot and ankle injuries on the rise
Source:
Virtual medical center.com

Sports-related injuries are part of the game, and as athletes are becoming stronger, faster, and better conditioned, higher-energy injuries are becoming common. Foot and ankle injuries are especially concerning because they are increasing in number and severity and are often misunderstood.

Read More


  Off-Season Conditioning Key to Future Wins

  Stay Safe Riding in Winter Terrain

  Even Just A Little Bit of Exercise Can Make a Big Impact

  Don't Overdo the Ibuprofen


Barefoot Running: Yeah or Nay?
Source:
dailyRX

Runners have worn footwear and gone barefoot while running to avoid injury

The barefoot running trend has gained popularity over the last decade, but scientists are unsure whether this is a good or bad thing. A recent study showed that it is less about whether a runner is wearing shoes and more about how they are running.

Read More


Young Athletes: Injuries and Prevention
Source:
MedicalNewsToday

High profile events like the Olympics bring the hope that witnessing and celebrating dedicated athletes at the top of their game, will inspire young people to take up sport and physical activities that help them develop confidence, lead more satisfying lives, and not least, secure long-term health by reducing their risk for developing chronic illness like diabetes, obesity, cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

But unfortunately, if they don't take appropriate measures, young athletes can instead, end up in pain, on a different path to poor health, due to avoidable sport injury.

Read More


Experts offer tips to help keep fall sports injury free
Source:
USnews.com

Fall sports such as soccer, football and volleyball are in high gear and players need to take steps to prevent injuries, experts say.

Read More


Deep abdominal muscle activation lessens lower back pain
Source:
News Medical

Improving transversus abdominis slide appears to be associated with clinically important long-term pain reduction in people experiencing lower back pain, researchers report.

Read More


Sports medicine physician recommends two high-tech tools to enhance patient care
Source:
News Medical

Research shows that the average person only retains 15 to 20 percent of what he or she is told during a medical appointment. According to Matt Roth, MD, associate medical director for ProMedica Sports Care, when patients have the opportunity to view actual images of their anatomy and diagnosis, their understanding and retention improves.

Read More


Arthroscopic surgery for torn shoulder muscles in elderly patients can reduce pain
Source:
News Medical

Repairing torn shoulder muscles in elderly patients is often discouraged because of fears of complications. But a new study conducted at Rush University Medical Center has shown that minimally invasive, or arthroscopic, surgery can significantly improve pain and function.

The study has just been published online in Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery and will appear in the October issue.

"In people over the age of 70, pain is the main issue, and pain relief is a fairly reliable outcome after surgery," said orthopedic surgeon Dr. Nikhil Verma, who led the study. "Patients do not require that their shoulder function be fully restored. They just want the pain to be gone." Verma is assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at Rush.

With that requirement, Verma said, "age is not a contraindication" for the surgery.

Read more


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